November 27, 2019

Sophia McMeechin was at A Gift of Art’s Card Making Party on Sunday. On Giving Tuesday, December 3 the cards will be gifted to Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Services, Fosterbrooke Long Term Care and the Clarington East Food Bank.

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NPS glee club shines

Under the direction of teachers Karen Wood and Ian Jack, Newcastle Public School’s choir of 65 children from Grade 3 to Grade 6 entered the highly competitive CBC Canadian Music Class Challenge.

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Santa continues his rounds with a stop in Orono

Ho, Ho, Ho, the big man gets around. Accompanied by two bands, 32 floats, numerous merry makers, and eagerly cheered in by a whole lot of people, he came to Orono on Sat morning. Youngsters lined the curbs in groups and cuddled up to keep warm. Parents and grandparents drank hot chocolate and caught up with friends.

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Who is really calling?

Not everyone is who they say they are.

In a recent press release, Durham Regional Police Services (DPRS) are warning the public about an increase in Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and Social Insurance Number (SIN) scams.

DRPS Communications Unit is seeing an increase in calls from residents reporting they have received calls from a person claiming to be an officer from the CRA. The scammers are also asking for SIN numbers under the pretense they were compromised. In a new twist, scammers are using the DRPS non-emergency line, 905-579-1520, to appear legitimate.

Caller ID spoofing is the practice of causing the telephone network to indicate to the receiver of a call that the originator of the call is a person – or in this case a police station, other than the true originating station.

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NHS Annual Christmas Show

Top photo left to right: Newcastle Horticultural Society 50 year members, Margery Freethy, Vicky Lesnick, Jean Rickard and Narda Hoogkamp. Bottom photo left to right: Kenzie Green, Margery Freethy, winner of the Rose Award, and George Maybury CIBC manager.

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Getting to Know Us – John Walsh

John Walsh grew up in Dublin Ireland, in a small house with his mom, dad, four sisters and one brother. It was crowded but a happy, loving place. Most of the houses in that Irish neighbourhood were small, so people would not stay in all day. They would go out and move around and meet at coffee shops (pubs) and socialize. And they worked. Young men would meet their dates at Cleary’s, the “Walmart of Ireland”.

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